TOWN OF SCARBOROUGH’S PREPAREDNESS PROJECT

THE RESILIENT CITIZEN

Be a Survivor, Not a Victim

Assess and Question

Answer such questions as: Where will you meet outside the building? Think about a disaster such as a tornado or a hurricane. If family members are separated, how will you know they’re okay? Who will you check in with?

  • FEMA Emergency ListMeet with household members to discuss the dangers of fire, severe weather, earthquakes and other emergencies. Explain how to respond to each.
  • Find the safe spots in your home for each type of disaster.
  • Discuss what to do about power outages and personal injuries.
  • Draw a floor plan of your home. Mark two escape routes from each room.
  • Show family members how to turn off the water, gas and electricity at main switches when necessary.
  • Post emergency telephone numbers near telephones.
  • Teach children how and when to call 911, police and fire.
  • Instruct household members to turn on the radio for emergency information.
  • Pick one out-of-state and one local friend or relative for family members to call if separated during a disaster (it is often easier to call out-of-state than within the affected area).
  • Teach children your out-of-state contact’ s phone numbers.
  • Pick two emergency meeting places.
    1. A place near your home in case of a fire.
    2. A place outside your neighborhood in case you cannot return home after a disaster.
  • Take a basic first aid and CPR class.
  • Download FEMA / American Red Cross Emergency Preparedness Checklist (a 4 page planning kit): http://www.fema.gov/pdf/library/epc.pdf
  • Disaster Supplies Checklist:  http://www.fema.gov/areyouready/appendix_b.shtm

Source: FEMA / American Red Cross Emergency Preparedness Checklist